On the list of stars we'd love to share a meal with, there's no doubt Josh Duhamel ranks pretty high. The "You're Not You" star and doting family man is ridiculously good-looking, super talented and he's dedicated to making the world a better place. Fergie's real-life leading man, who's teaming up with Unilever Project Sunlight on their Share a Meal campaign to end child hunger, chatted with Wonderwall.com about why dinnertime is a special time at the Duhamel household, how his 14-month-old son affected his decision to head back to TV, Axl's plans for Halloween and more. Read on for the highlights or watch the full interview in the video above.

Wonderwall: You and your wife are so busy, so what's a typical dinner like for your family -- do you prioritize family meals?

"We try to. Now that [Axl's] eating regular food, it's a lot more fun. I'll tell you who really loves it: my dog. She's never been more attentive than when my son is eating because he throws half his food on the floor. It's truly a family affair when we all get together to eat."

WW: You're heading back to television in 'Battle Creek' later this year. What made this the right time for you to return to TV?

"A big reason was I got to be home. I got to be there either in the morning or at night. I didn't want to be away for the first year of my kid's life. That was a big reason why I stayed."

WW: What are your plans for Halloween this year -- can you preview Axl's costume?

"I'm not sure what I'm gonna be wearing yet. I think he's gonna be a skunk, but we have to think about it. My sister and her kids are coming to town and my dad's coming to town, so we have a whole bunch of people coming. … Last year we went crazy with it. We dressed up two nights for two different parties, and I let my wife convince me to go through the whole painting of the face. I sat there for like hours getting the stuff on. So this year it's gonna be just a mask."

WW: How has fatherhood affected your desire to get involved in certain charity initiatives?

"Having a child puts everything in perspective. It gives you a different perspective on things. I never thought about stuff like this before. A couple years ago, my wife took me to this food bank as a Christmas gift because I told her I didn't want anything -- 'I've got enough stuff!' And I remember being irritated about it. I feel guilty about that now. I was irritated because I didn't get to stay home and watch my football games. But I remember being so thankful to her afterwards because it was just such a rewarding experience to go and chip in in my own little way. That stuck with me. … It's selfishly something that makes me feel good at the end of the day. It's definitely something that I want to impart on my son."

WW: Tell us about your partnership with Unilever Project Sunlight.

"We are here today to bring awareness to something that a lot of people don't know about, which is child hunger in the US. One in five kids don't know where their next meal is coming from. Unilever's whole initiative on sustainability is about really creating a brighter future for children. … My wife has worked with them in the past, and when they came to me to see if I wanted to be a part of it, I was more than willing to do it."

WW: What was your reaction to Project Sunlight's "Going to Bed Hungry: The Changing Face of Child Hunger" documentary?

"It's one of those things that you can't help but be touched by, these stories of these families who are struggling. It's sad. … For whatever reason, for whatever situation they've been put in, they don't have the means to [put food on the table]. As a parent, you never want to worry about something like that."