Ashley Judd is writing another book.

Page Six reports that the actress, 49, has been pitching publishers on a memoir "that will talk frankly about the sexual assaults she suffered at the hands of Harvey Weinstein and others from the time she was in second grade."

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The New York Post column's Richard Johnson also writes that there's a bidding war over the manuscript.

According to insiders, he adds, the advance alone could top $1 million.

This would be Ashley's second book. Her first, 2011's "All That Is Bitter & Sweet," was a bestseller. It chronicled her difficult childhood growing up in Kentucky with her musician mom and sister, Naomi and Wynonna Judd, her struggle with depression and her rebirth as a social justice advocate.

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In an early October story in The New York Times, Ashley went public with allegations of Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein's sexual misconduct, opening the door for dozens more women, many of them other A-list stars, to speak out about the mogul's bad behavior.

Two decades ago, Ashley told the NYT, she thought she was meeting Harvey for a business breakfast at the Peninsula Beverly Hills hotel. Instead, she was instructed to go to his room, where he greeted her in a bathrobe. He then asked her if he could massage her -- or if she would watch him shower, she claimed.

Ashley sat down with Diane Sawyer in late October to speak about her allegations on-camera for the first time. She said that even after she declined Harvey's advances, he continued to pressure her. "I thought 'no' meant 'no,'" she explained.

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"He kept coming back at me with all this other stuff. And finally I just said, 'When I win an Oscar in one of your movies, okay?' And he was like, 'Yeah, when you get nominated.' And I said, 'No, when I win an Oscar.' And then I just fled."

As for why she kept silent for so long, she added, "If I could go back retrospectively with a magic wand... I don't know if I would have been believed," she said. "And who was I to tell? The concierge that sent me up to the room?"