TBILISI, Georgia (AP) -- Georgia isn't likely to expect many votes from Russia at this year's Eurovision Song Contest — not with a ditty that teases Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin.

The song, chosen as Georgia's entry on Wednesday, is titled "We Don't Wanna Put In."

In case anyone thinks that's just a bit of awkward grammar, the intent becomes clear from the singers' Georgian-accented pronunciation: "poot een," just like the Russian premier.

"We don't want to put in/the negative mood/it's killing the groove," runs the chorus of the song performed by 3G and Stephane.

Georgia initially hadn't wanted to enter this year's extravaganza of pop and rock because it will be held in Moscow on May 12-16.

Georgia and Russia broke diplomatic relations last summer in the wake of the August war during which Russia took control of two separatist Georgian regions and inflicted heavy damage on Georgia's military.

"At first, the decision was taken not to take part in Eurovision in Moscow. But then we received letters from representatives of virtually all the countries that take part in this prestigious competition; they all asked us to change our decision and send our singers," said Ratia Uznadze, director of international projects for Georgia's Channel One television.

Eurovision, also called Eurosong, is better known for preposterous outfits and featherweight melodies than for politics, although Ukraine's Greenjolly did perform their Orange Revolution anthem "Razom Nas Bagato" in 2005.

The show is so popular across Europe that people often travel across the continent to support their favorite singers at the gala.

The Georgian entry fits perfectly in the tradition of exuberant tackiness. The melody sounds straight from the 1970s height — or nadir — of disco.

The 3G are three girls in hot pants; Stephane's appearance and stage moves resemble Groucho Marx imitating John Travolta.

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On the Web:

3G and Stephane performing at Georgian Eurovision final:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?vQq-M2Jn8RA&featurerelated

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AP correspondent Jim Heintz contributed to this story from Moscow.