Kevin Mazur / WireImage 1 / 5
Kevin Mazur / WireImage 1 / 5

Adele is turning to comfort food following the sound glitch that marred her Grammys performance.

The 27-year-old singer's rendition of "All I Ask" at the Los Angeles on Feb. 15, 2016 ceremony sounded off-key at points and at times the songstress looked visibly nervous.

Taking to Twitter after her performance, Adele explained what went wrong and also revealed that she was treating herself to some fast food in the wake of the technical problems.

She wrote: "The piano mics fell on to the piano strings, that's what the guitar sound was. It made it sound out of tune. S--- happens. X.

"Because of it though... I'm treating myself to an in n out. So maybe it was worth it."

Shortly after Adele's performance CBS released a statement, explaining that there was a "five-to-eight second technical issue" with the broadcast and added that it was outside the network's control.

And Academy President Neil Portnow admitted that producers were forced to switch to a backup sound system during Adele's song -- which resulted in the audio dropping momentarily at the start of the song.

Ever the professional, Adele soldiered on and still received a standing ovation for her efforts.

"I love you Kendrick. You're amazing," she told the crowd after her performance. Although she looked frustrated, she quickly turned on a huge megawatt smile upon receiving big cheers from the crowd.

Twitter was quickly awash with reaction from angry fans, who were quick to blame the sound technicians.

"The sound guy just messed up the sound during Adele's performance so everyone get your damn pitchforks," wrote Twitter user @TheMichelleBui.

@NickiFioravante added: "All of the sound guys in the building better be fired immediately. #adele #Grammys2016."

While @AdamDSchick tweeted: "I'm pretty sure blowing the sound mix on an @Adele performance is a federal crime… What is up with that guitar hit?!? #GRAMMYs."

Adele has previously admitted that she gets nervous before performing. In a November 2015 interview with NPR, she said, "I get so nervous with live performances that I'm too frightened to try anything new."