@HPPlayLDN / Twitter 1 / 4
@HPPlayLDN / Twitter 1 / 4

The world's favorite wizard is back, but this time he won't be on the big screen -- he'll be on the stage!

And now, we're getting our first glimpse at the new Harry Potter stage play, "Harry Potter and the Cursed Child," the eighth Potter story and the series' first stage play, opening July 30 at the Palace Theatre in London's West End.

Previews for the show begin next week.

The play's official Twitter account released new images of the final two principle characters on June 2 and the play is looking darker and darker with the new additions. New images show Young Scorpius (Anthony Boyle) looking absolutely terrified of his father and Harry's schoolyard nemesis Draco Malfoy (Alex Price.)

Draco looks more and more like his evil father Lucius in the new image.

Scorpius is a spitting image of his father, but perhaps not as vile.

The last book in J.K. Rowling's series, "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows," ended 19 years after the Battle of Hogwarts, when Harry waved his two eldest children off to the wizarding school. The "Cursed Child" picks up from there, focusing on Harry's job and his son's struggle to live up to family name. Harry has certainly moved on from his life after Hogwarts and now works in the The Ministry Of Magic.

In the play, Sam Clemment plays Albus Potter, the middle son of Harry and his wife Ginny.

Sam took to Twitter on Tuesday to announce that he will be taking on the highly anticipated role. "Thrilled to announce I will be playing Albus Severus Potter in @HPPlayLDN :D," he wrote.

Some of the cast announcements were made several months ago. Originally, Harry, Hermione and Ron were played by Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson and Rupert Grint. Naturally, there was hesitation among fans about the new faces associated with the beloved characters.

Noma Dumezweni, who plays Hermione in the play, told The Guardian last week, "I didn't realize the emotional effect. Not on me, but on other people. That's why I talk about it as a privilege and a responsibility."

The play smashed a West End record, selling 175,000 tickets in just 24 hours.