Tim Rooke / REX Shutterstock / Rex USA 1 / 3
Tim Rooke / REX Shutterstock / Rex USA 1 / 3

Prince Harry is angry and he's not holding back in this fight.

Prince Harry, 31, took a tour of Krugar National Park on Dec. 2 and was shocked to discover the body of a dead rhino, who was killed for her horns by poachers. Rhino horns have become more valuable than gold, which explains the increase with which these animals are being slaughtered.

A visibly upset Prince Harry looked on at the dead rhino and said, "This belongs to South Africa and it's been stolen by other people."

Later that day, he spoke at nearby Southern African Wildlife College about preserving Africa's wildlife.

"My love of Africa has never been any secret," Prince Harry said. "It's just been a huge part of my private life. I've always wanted to keep it like that until I had the experience of age to give something back to a place that has given me and so

many others the freedom and space we all crave. This continent has given me thousands of happy memories since 1997 and for that I am indebted to it."

Krugar National Park's rhino population has greatly suffered at the hands of poachers recently and there is a great worry that the animals will become extinct soon.

"If current poaching rates continue," Prince Harry said. "There will be no wild African elephants or rhinos left by the time children born this year, like my niece, Charlotte, turn 25. If we let this happen, the impact on the long-term prosperity of this country and on the natural heritage of the planet will be enormous and irreversible."

Preserving wildlife is very important to Prince Harry, who also spent three months in Africa over the summer working with veterinarians and rangers to learn all about the issues and how to stop animal poaching.