Stop us if you've heard this before: Tori Spelling and her husband, Dean McDermott, are in financial turmoil.

According to the DailyMail.com, a judge ruled that Tori and Dean have to pay off a $220,000 debt to City National Bank this week.

In March, City National Bank issued a default judgment against the couple for $188,000, saying the new parents took out a $400,000 loan in 2012 and only paid back about half of it.

The Daily Mail's report said at the time that the bank also wants another $17,000 that Tori allegedly overdrew from her checking account. Court records alleged that she "caused her account to be overdrawn in the amount of $17,149.09. The defendant has not paid back the overdraft."

The bank has said that Tori had been served with legal documents but had blown off the case and missed the deadline to respond to the accusations. Court documents obtained by the website said the judge granted the bank's motion for default judgment and ordered the couple to cough up $202,066.10 to City National, plus $17,730.56 for a grand total of $219.796.66.

Over the years, Tori and Dean have been riddled with money issues. Last year, it was reported that the reality stars had been slapped with a federal tax lien for $707,487.30 in unpaid taxes for 2014.

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The news came just a few weeks after the couple made headlines as TMZ revealed they owed the state of California $259,108.23 in back taxes, also for 2014.

This all comes on top of some serious credit card debt: In January, American Express sued Tori to the tune of $37,981.97 in unpaid bills. In November 2016, American Express sued her for another $87,000 credit card debt.

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In March, Dean was held in contempt of court and narrowly avoided jail time for months of unpaid spousal support to ex-wife Mary Jo Eustace. A judge, though, allowed him and Mary to make a deal that would spare him jail time.

The two struck a payment deal, but Page Six said at the time that Mary "will not hesitate to re-file paperwork" to send Dean to jail if he doesn't follow through with payments.