Cameron Douglas is living up his newfound freedom in New York City.

The 37-year-old son of Michael Douglas and his ex-wife, Diandra, was released from prison early after serving nearly seven years on drug charges. Cameron was transferred to a halfway house in Brooklyn weeks ago, and he has been spotted hitting the streets with his girlfriend, yoga instructor Viviane Thibes.

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So, what has Cameron been up to following his release? Modeling! (Apparently the hot trend for former convicts.) He wrote alongside one shot of him posing in a tank top, "Dreaming big today & So grateful for it."

Dreaming big today & So grateful for it

A photo posted by Cameron Douglas (@cameronmorrelldouglas) on

His biggest post-prison reveal? A giant stomach tattoo featuring his father's face -- from Michael's Oscar-winning role as Gordon Gekko in "Wall Street" -- and his grandfather, legendary "The Bad and the Beautiful" actor Kirk Douglas, with "TIMELESS" scrawled underneath.

Not going to quit until I get there. #tattoo #bodyink #camerondouglas

A photo posted by Cameron Douglas (@cameronmorrelldouglas) on

Cameron also shared a tribute to his 99-year-old grandfather, captioning it, "They don't make them like this anymore. This man inspired me through my entire bit..."

Otherwise, Cameron is just generally documenting being a New Yorker, except with fewer selfies on his Instagram. (Give him time to catch up.)

And with Page Six reporting that he plans to write a book about his years in prison and his struggles as the child and grandchild of Hollywood icons, Cameron promised to start sharing poems with his fans.

Cameron was sentenced to five years for possession of heroin and selling methamphetamine in 2010, a sentence that was extended when he admitted to smuggling drugs into prison. In 2013, he penned an op-ed for The Huffington Post about the "outdated" justice system.

"I'm not saying that I didn't deserve to be punished or that I'm worthy of special treatment," he wrote. "I made mistakes and I'll gladly and openly admit my faults. However, I seem to be trapped in a vicious cycle of relapse and repeat, as most addicts are. Unfortunately, whereas the effective remedy for relapse should be treatment, the penal system's 'answer' is to lock the door and throw away the key."